While death is inevitable, it often sneaks up on us without warning. When you are faced with dealing with the aftermath of the death of someone close to you, it can difficult to handle the grief and still juggle the other responsibilities needed.

Grief Support #1: Counsellor

Sometimes the sudden death of a family member can throw you into a shock that ‘s hard to escape on your own. If you find that you are struggling with coping with the death, it is advisable to find someone to speak to about how you feel.

Friends and family can be great listeners. However, it may be uncomfortable to approach them with how you are feeling or you may not want to burden them with how you feel. A professional counsellor can help you work through your feelings and begin the healing process.

Counsellors don’t necessarily be psychologists or psychiatrists; you can also seek help from your religious community or leader who will be able to help you through your hard time. These persons can be reached in numerous ways; however, many counselling firms have websites that offer more information, such as Alliance Counselling.

Grief Support #2: Legal Advice

After a death has occurred, many matters must be handled that involve legal knowledge that you may not be aware of. To ease the stress associated with managing these issues, a lawyer can be hired.

Estate taxes, inheritances, and insurance are essential elements of the legal side of matters that are often too complicated for the average person the handle. To ensure that you do not make any mistakes while handling these issues, consult with a legal professional and handing over issues that you cannot resolve on your own.

In cases where inheritance is allotted in a will or through the mandate of the state, there can occasionally be civil disputes among family members and relatives who do not agree with the particular method of division or the recipient. The counsel of a lawyer would be ideal to prevent these situations from arising.

Grief Support #3: Financial Advisors

The need for financial advice after death is equally as important as the need for legal advice. If the person that has died was contributing to your household, you might be left in financial turmoil at the loss of income.

Deaths require funeral and burial services, which are incredibly expensive and can quickly drain a savings account or be costly enough to need a loan to cover. Financial advisors help to keep you within your budget and help to set up realistic saving goals for you in the future. Managing the money that you have currently, and learning to manage any money that comes in from inheritance or insurance policies is essential in ensuring that you do not go bankrupt within the first year of your loved one’s death.

Spending money on an advisor may seem counterproductive. However, the information that they supply you with and the services they perform are more than worth the fee they will charge for their knowledge.

Grief Support #4: Friends and Family

When you are grieving the loss of someone you love, there is no comfort like the comfort of your friends and family. Death causes pain. However, it also draws in people to stand together to face it as a unit.

If someone you love has passed away, leaning on your family and friends can help you transition into living your life without this person by helping you remember them in a healthy way. Taking up hobbies and returning to your life as normally as you can help create a semblance of structure in your life that you can continue following until you have begun the healing process.

Take a vacation or spend some time at home focusing on channelling your grief and finding a way to fight through it. Remember that your family and friends are here to help you as you deal with the aftermath.

To learn on how to cope with death, read more on death issues.

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C.E.O @ The New Savvy
Anna Haotanto is passionate about finance, education, women empowerment and children’s issues. Anna has been featured in CNBC, Forbes, The Straits Times, Business Insider, INC and The Peak Singapore. She was nominated and selected for FORTUNE Most Powerful Women conference in 2016 (Asia) and 2015 (San Francisco, Next Gen). Anna has 10 years of experience in the financial sector and is currently a Director in Tera Capital. Her previous work experience includes positions at Citigroup, United Overseas Bank, a regional role in Business Monitor and a boutique private equity firm based in Shanghai. She graduated from Singapore Management University (Finance and Quantitative Finance).