The job market in Singapore, according to Singapore Expats, is dominated primarily by the manufacturing and service industries, maintaining a lower overall employment rate than that of highly developed countries such as the U.S.

But despite positive economic growth, there are several key reasons an individual may lose their job.

Work Performance

  1. Inability to properly complete job-related tasks in among the top reasons for getting fired. This can include; slow or poor job performance, insubordination and misuse of company property. AboutCareers.com adds that 22% of employees terminated were fired for use of personal internet activities during company time, which includes checking social media sites or answering personal texts and emails. Refraining from personal activities on company time is essential to maintaining a position.
    Before looking for new employment, consider getting these habits under control. Etiquette mistakes in an office setting are another primary behaviour that can lead to eventual termination.

Retrenchment

  1. When job loss results from retrenchment circumstances, emotional reactions are likely to occur.. The employee may feel hostile, angry or even resent the company. This is common practice in the business industry when manufacturing costs must be cut for the health of the company, or a product is not leaving shelves as fast as it is leaving the factory. Take some time to deal with these negative emotions before pursuing new employment. Fear can be a huge part of job loss, but keep in mind that this may not happen again and vow to be financially prepared by saving.

Job Dissatisfaction

  1. Job dissatisfaction is the number one reason for poor work performance. If an employee was terminated for poor performance due to unhappiness at work, then some self-reflection is absolutely necessary before moving on. What about the previous job was the primary cause for the unhappiness? If work environment is the cause rather than the type of work, keep a positive attitude that the next employer will be an improvement. If the type of work is in fact the reason behind unhappiness, then perhaps a change of fields is necessary to avoid repetitive termination.Consider taking a sabbatical before returning to the job field in order to start fresh with the new company.

In the case of such terminations resulting from poor job performance or absenteeism, it is important to assess personal behaviour before beginning a new positive. Take credit for accomplishments, but also be honest concerning poor performance and create a game plan for improvement to avoid making the same mistakes twice.

Once the interviewing process has begun, it is important to have a plan for answering questions involving a previous termination. Research indicates suggestions for dealing with these difficult questions during a job interview that will most likely come up during discussion.

In general, avoid the blame game and bad mouthing previous employers and be aware of tone of voice and body language when discussing reasons for termination regardless of the reason in which you were fired. Assure that you are in the right frame of mind and deal with any emotion residue left over from feelings when a termination has occurred before beginning the job search process.

Unchecked emotions can spill over into a new positive and cause further job loss so take the time for personal management as well as financial.

More information if you are looking to Work From Home -Freelancing Online or Setting up a New Company in Singapore.

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C.E.O @ The New Savvy
Anna Haotanto is passionate about finance, education, women empowerment and children’s issues. Anna has been featured in CNBC, Forbes, The Straits Times, Business Insider, INC and The Peak Singapore. She was nominated and selected for FORTUNE Most Powerful Women conference in 2016 (Asia) and 2015 (San Francisco, Next Gen). Anna has 10 years of experience in the financial sector and is currently a Director in Tera Capital. Her previous work experience includes positions at Citigroup, United Overseas Bank, a regional role in Business Monitor and a boutique private equity firm based in Shanghai. She graduated from Singapore Management University (Finance and Quantitative Finance).