2017 fashion trends are breaking all the rules of fashion. Tracksuits are strutting down the runways, White and pink are in all the fall line-ups.  The fashion rules have changed. You can strike these few faux pas off of your Vogue Don’ts list.

Always wear nylons – In the summer months, it is okay to go bare.  With the high price of nylons today, it is good for the pocket book to take one season off from buying hosiery. If you are keeping up with your yoga routine, no one will notice if you forgot the hose.

Buy name brands – Can you guess which one is the brand name? Today, you get more credit for having fashion sense if you can achieve the same look without the price tag of brand names. If you can find the perfect scarf to match your dress at the vintage store, you not only get points for recycling but you also have achieved a look no one else can exactly replicate. Discount stores or thrifts are good for staples. The perfect little black dress may be hanging on the rack at Wal-marts. The navy blue blazer never goes out of style.

Bumbags – Better to be safe than make a fashion statement. Bumbags, or money pouches, are still one of the best ways to guard your money. Whoever made these a fashion faux pas is a tasteless style guru. Wear your bumbag behind you, though, and anyone can easily steal your money. Wear it in the front and the pickpockets will never get your money. Flat money folders can be worn close to the body and concealed.

Affordable Alternatives For High-End Brands

Match handbags and shoes – The stylish girl no longer has perfectly matching handbags and shoes. The haute fashion fan is more likely to mix it up. Neutral coloured handbags – black, blue, beige – can match up with all your shoes. Bold colours and designs are also in. She may have a wider range of handbags picked up at a thrift shop, in a wide range of patterns and colours.

Silly Fashion Rules That Don’t Make Financial Sense - Ignore Them

No white shoes after winter – This was considered the ultimate fashion faux pas. The fashion mavens now say you can wear white shoes and belts all year long. Crisp white blouses are always in. White wool is irresistible. You can still decide to pass on the white shoes.

Pink is for the spring and summer – Pink and pastels are worn all year long. Pink is losing its connotations. Politically, pink was the far left. Socially, pink was gay and liberal. Pink no longer has labels. A vibrant rose pink exudes warmth in the winter. Vogue is featuring 40 pink fashions for this fall.

Tracksuits – Tracksuits – and even in velour! – are on the runway this year. Vogue says they are no longer for chavs.  The track suit has been overhauled, claims the fashion bible, and can even be worn with jewellery.

Street style breaks all the fashion rules. Elle is parading outrageous fashion faux pas on the street – pink with winter wools, see-through tops (faux), hot pants, and all white in fall. Remember, on the street, you are setting the trends that will appear on the runways next year.

The perfect black dress and a navy blue blazer can still take you to many places, dressed up or dressed down. Still out are visible panty lines.

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C.E.O @ The New Savvy
Anna Haotanto is passionate about finance, education, women empowerment and children’s issues. Anna has been featured in CNBC, Forbes, The Straits Times, Business Insider, INC and The Peak Singapore. She was nominated and selected for FORTUNE Most Powerful Women conference in 2016 (Asia) and 2015 (San Francisco, Next Gen). Anna has 10 years of experience in the financial sector and is currently a Director in Tera Capital. Her previous work experience includes positions at Citigroup, United Overseas Bank, a regional role in Business Monitor and a boutique private equity firm based in Shanghai. She graduated from Singapore Management University (Finance and Quantitative Finance).