Happy International Women’s Day!

Here at The New Savvy, we believe that women should achieve her full potential in all its forms: socially, culturally, politically, and of course, economically. That is why we publish articles, guides, and tips on how women can improve her finances and her career. We push our readers to work harder, spend smarter, and invest better because we know you are as good as our male counterparts, no questions about it.

However, this year’s International Women’s Day (or IWD for short) theme reminded us that we still have a long way to go. Or to be more accurate, a long time to go. According to the official International Women’s Day website, with the current progress rate, we will only achieve gender parity (i.e. the state or condition of being equal) in 117 years.

International Women’s Day: Equality in the Workforce

We don’t know about you, but we think it’s ridiculous (and offensive) that it takes that long for women to reach equal economic rights. Does this mean that we have to deal with so-called glass ceilings for another 117 years? How about the gender wage gap? And getting equal pay for equal/comparable work?

We want women’s hard work everywhere being valued as equally as everyone else. We also want everyone to know that women’s contribution to society bring benefits that it cannot do without. Economically speaking, a Gallup study even concluded that hiring women and maintaining demographically balanced workforce improves its financial performance. When women don’t advance, the economy suffers.

International Women’s Day 2016, #PledgeForParity

International Women’s Day: Challenges and solutions

However, women bear many challenges, both culturally and systemically through policies and laws, that can delay or even stop their participation in the workforce. According to a report on Gender Equality in Education, Employment and Entrepreneurship compiled for the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development in 2012, it is difficult for women to achieve full potential in paid work ‘if high childcare costs mean that it is economically not worthwhile for women to work full-time, if (the) workplace culture penalise women for taking a break to have a child or provide for elderly relatives, and as long as women continue to bear the main brunt of unpaid household tasks, child care and caring for ageing parents.

Therefore, it is important for us to advocate for family-friendly policies as a push for women’s advancement in the workplace so women and men can participate better and fuller. We should also strive towards a better division of housework between husbands and wives (related: benefits for men). This results in happier families, employees, and better company profits. It is truly a win-win situation for all!

International Women’s Day: 9 Ways You Can #PledgeforParity

This year, the theme for IWD is ‘Pledging for Parity’. We want to contribute to the acceleration of gender parity progress and we want you, our female and male readers to join us. Let’s take action to accelerate women’s economic progress everywhere. Here are 9 pledges you can make:

Accelerator #1 – Illuminate the path to leadership: make career opportunities more visible to women

– I pledge to help a woman on my team identify and secure her next promotion

– I pledge to identify opportunities for women on my teams to lead

– I pledge to become a better teammate by learning more about why gender parity matters

Accelerator #2 – Speed up culture change with progressive corporate policy

– I pledge to help create a culture of flexibility for everyone on my team

– I pledge to encourage men on my teams to take paternity leave

– I pledge to seek out perspectives different from my own and encourage everyone to contribute

Accelerator #3 – Build supportive environments and work to eliminate conscious and unconscious bias

– I pledge to become a sponsor for a woman to help her achieve her professional ambitions

– I pledge to challenge our leaders to ensure men and women are treated equally

– I pledge to become more aware of my own biases and work to eliminate them

Which of these #PledgeforParity will you take? Share with us on our Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram!

FINANCIAL LITERACY AMONG WOMEN IN ASIA

Recommend0 recommendationsPublished in Inspirations
SHARE
Previous articleTravel Insurance In Singapore – Insurance 101
Next articleInvest Like Warren Buffett – His New & Best Investing Rules
C.E.O @ The New Savvy
Anna Haotanto is passionate about finance, education, women empowerment and children’s issues. Anna has been featured in CNBC, Forbes, The Straits Times, Business Insider, INC and The Peak Singapore. She was nominated and selected for FORTUNE Most Powerful Women conference in 2016 (Asia) and 2015 (San Francisco, Next Gen). Anna has 10 years of experience in the financial sector and is currently a Director in Tera Capital. Her previous work experience includes positions at Citigroup, United Overseas Bank, a regional role in Business Monitor and a boutique private equity firm based in Shanghai. She graduated from Singapore Management University (Finance and Quantitative Finance).